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About the trainer
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Fair Horsemanship is a humane, science-based horse training service created by the animal trainer and qualified NAC equine behaviourist, Alizé Veillard-Muckensturm.

 

Alizé holds a 1st class BSc (Hons) Animal Behaviour and Welfare from Hartpury University and frequently attend CPD courses and events to maintain and further develop her skills.

 

She is dedicated to promoting non-coercive training methods, to reduce the use of aversive tools and methods in handling and training animals, and to promote appropriate management. She is most known for being the author of the first equine clicker training book that did not suggest the use of any unnecessary aversive stimulation.

Alizé provides private lessons and training sessions within South Wales and West England,  training days, international talks and online consultations. To learn more visit the services tab on the website.

Our guiding principles

 

Equine emotional and physical health is our priority.

We believe pain should be ruled out by a veterinarian before undergoing behavioural modification for unwanted behaviours such as aggression. We also want to encourage regular hoof care, well-fitted tack, alternatives to forced weaning/separation from herd mates, the elimination of pain or fear inflicting devices such as whips, dressage sticks, spurs, bits, chains and fixative tack.

 

Species appropriate horse management.

We promote an equine management style that promotes freedom of movement, daily social interactions between conspecifics, an enriched environment and a forage-based diet.

 

Humane, science-based horse training.

We use antecedent arrangement, positive reinforcement, differential reinforcement, counter-conditioning, habituation and systematic desensitisation. Not only these techniques are scientifically proven efficient with a wide range of species, but they are also the more humane approach to behaviour modification. It is important for us to help horse owners reduce the use of more invasive techniques such as negative reinforcement, negative and positive punishment as well as flooding.